Fence Repair – Replacing a Broken Fence Post

Handyman Atlanta

It may sound like a daunting task to exchange a damaged fence post yet it’s much less difficult as it might seem. It can have a little bit of hard work plus some simple tools you almost certainly curently have in the shed or garage. Where can you start? Initially you should assess the project and the damage. Did the post rot and merely break or was it sheered off because of some nasty climate conditions. Can there be still a remaining stump or perhaps it broken off at the ground or concrete level? Do not be afraid, the job is moderately difficult and may usually about 1 to 2 hours of your time to accomplish as well as your fence will probably be good as new.

Atlanta Handyman

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Time Required: Approximately 1 to 2 Hours

Required Tools

– Shovel

– Pry Bar

– Level

– 1 Replacement Post – Typically 4″ x 4″ x 8′ Cedar or Treated Lumber

– 1 – 80 Pound Bag of Quickrete Concrete Mix

– 3″ Wood Screws (Approximately 12 Screws)

Optional Tools

– Auger or Clam Shell Post Hole Digger

– Bag of Gravel

– Hand Saw or Circular Saw

Typically, most fence posts are positioned in to the ground using concrete but others are installed using packed dirt inside the fence post hole. Should you not see concrete in the walk out, take a regular shovel and dig down a couple of inches near the broken post location and find out in the event you hit concrete. Most fence posts are placed in concrete but for the greater degree an ordinary post hole is concerning eight (8″) to 12 (12″) inches in diameter and most have to do with twenty-four (24″) inches deep.

There are several ways of thinking with regards to removing a current post. Many people choose to smash and grab technique which can be simply employing a hammer and chisel or pry bar to interrupt the concrete into small pieces and pull them out of the existing hole one by one. The tactic does work but quite a bit of work this means you will take between one (1) and 2 (2) hours of training to extract the concrete from the hole. It really is fine when you have an individual post to change but when you’ll find multiple, the task involved is quite tedious and tiring and there are good ways.

The method I prefer is always to have a long, skinny bladed shovel and find out the dirt simply to the medial side with the concrete exposing the inside from the concrete block. Just be sure you pile the dirt near the hole because dirt you remove will probably be used to re-pack the hole once the post and concrete block is slowly removed from your ground. Through the regarding the concrete, find about six (6″) to eight (8″) inches and down twenty-four (24″) inches. This enables for the pocket as wide because concrete block. In case a piece or stump in the existing post is still in position, technology-not only and initiate moving the concrete block forward and backward while using the new pocket space you only created. Once it’s loose, you should be able to use your shovel or pry bar being a lever and lift the concrete block from the hole. Take care and make certain you lift together with your legs because the concrete block can weigh around eighty (80) pounds. In the event the existing post or post stump is no longer coupled to the concrete, you have to be able to utilize a pry bar or perhaps your shovel to go the current concrete block forward and backward in a similar manner loosening it by reviewing the original placement. Once, the block is movable, utilize the same process as pointed out but be careful to utilize proper lifting techniques when taking out the concrete. A doctors visit is just not prescribed on this project.

When the block is slowly removed, make use of the dirt you taken from the excavation to fill out the six (6″) to eight (8″) inches you originally dug out. Be sure to pack the dirt solidly as it will provide the lateral support for your new post if it is set up. The concrete you employ when you set the newest post will give you a good amount of support in addition to attaching the prevailing fence structure but the better you pack the dirt, the greater the end result. You have to be still having a standard hole approximately twenty-four (24″) inches deep and approximately eight (8″) to 12 (12″) inches wide.

From this level, you must take the clam digger or post hole digger or if you don’t have one, exclusively use your shovel and find out approximately two (2″) inches towards the bottom of the hole. You can add loose gravel in these two (2″) inches for drainage to keep water away from the bottom from the post. If you don’t have or failed to obtain a bag of gravel once you purchased your replacement post and concrete, do not worry. The concrete has gravel in it and can work though the gravel does result in the drainage more efficient. Once you have the camp in place, it is time to install the replacement post.

Grab your replacement post and center it inside the hole. If you have a helper, ask them to retain the post and ensure who’s lines up correctly together with the fence and also the old post you simply removed. Once you’ve it in the correct position, open an eighty (80) pound bag of Quickrete concrete and pour it dry to the hole. Remember to be wearing eye protection also to cover the mouth so that you usually do not inhale the concrete dust that typically spews out of your hole as you pour in the mixture. Pour every one of the contents to the hole. Grab the garden hose or a bucket of water and start pouring water to the hole and make certain to pour round the new post in the circular pattern to make sure you have the whole top layer in the concrete wet. The lake will start to bubble as it starts seeping towards the bottom. Carry on and add water until it pools somewhat. It will absorb from the mix. At this point, bring your pry bar or possibly a little bit of rebar or possibly a sturdy stick and start poking the concrete mixture to aid get the water circulation as a result of the underside and also get rid of the air bubbles that form. It really is OK if your water pools a little try not to result in the mixture too wet because it will require longer to set.

Now take the level and be sure how the post remains in their upright vertical position. It’s helpful if you review multiple sides and ensure the bubble about the level is in the middle and relating to the marks. After the post is level, use items of wood to produce a stand of sorts at the bottom to maintain the post still whilst the concrete establishes overnight. The concrete begins setting and based on the climate must be ready in the morning to re-hang fences pieces. If the post moves, wiggle it in the vertical position then utilizing your stick or pry bar, move the concrete mix around so that it touches the post on every side on your lawn without any gaps. If gaps form, you may need to include a bit of additional water to really make the mixture more liquid. Any pooled water will be distributed around the concrete and surrounding dirt and in addition evaporate as the concrete sets.

The following day, you should be in a position to re-affix a gate to the post and it needs to be good as new. Prior to deciding to attach the existing fence pieces, you can examine the height from the fence post as compared to the other posts within your fence line. With regards to the most your fence, you might want to utilize a hand or electric saw to reduce the new post to complement the other posts on your own fence. If your post does not need to be cut, then you can certainly attach the previous fence pieces for the new post. Be sure you use screws when you attach a fence it into the new post to make sure a much more stable connection than nails which may grab in windy or water conditions as time passes causing integrity issues.

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